Acción Psicológica http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><strong>Acción Psicológica</strong><span> </span>is an international semiannual journal published by the Faculty of Psychology of the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED) since 2002. Publishes original research, review, theoretical or methodological contributions, as well as case studies on different areas of Psychology and Life Sciences.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><strong><strong>Accion Psicologica</strong> has been indexed in Emerging Source Citation Index (ESCI) by Clarivate Analytics.</strong></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><strong>Acción Psicológica</strong><span> </span>is indexed in the folllowing databases:</p><ul style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><li>Bibliographical (International): Emerging Source Citation Index (ESCI - Clarivate Analytics), Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Premier and Fuente Academica Plus (EBSCO), ProQuest Psychology Journals, ProQuest Central, ProQuest Central K-12, ProQuest Health Research Premiun Collectium, ProQuest Hospital Premiun Collection, DOAJ, FirstSearch (OCLC), PubPsych (ZPID), SciELO, Open J-Gate, Dialnet, e-Revistas, Redalyc and EuroPub.</li><li>Bibliographical (National): COMPLUDOC, ISOC (CSIC-CINDOC), PSICODOC, PSYKE.</li><li>Assessment of quality of journals: CIRC, DICE, ERIH PLUS, IN-RECS, LATINDEX, MIAR, RESH.</li><li>Identification of journals: ISSN, Ulrich´s.</li><li>Library Catalogues: ARIADNA (BNE), REBIUN, CCPP (MECyD), WORLDCAT (USA).</li><li>Repositories: E-spacio, E-ciencia, Recolecta.</li></ul><p style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">Impact Factor IN-RECS 2011 = 0.362 (Journal Rank 21. 2Q. Subject Category = Psychology).</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><strong>Acción Psicológica accomplishes the requirements of the Ph.D of UNED. The journal meets the 33 LATINDEX quality criteria.</strong></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">Journal Profile in<span> </span><a href="https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=3EYWE6AAAAAJ">Google Scholar</a>.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">Rejection rate: 2015 64%, 2016 74%, 2017 77%, 2018 80%. 2019 79%.</p> Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia en-US Acción Psicológica 1578-908X <p style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Accion Psicologica<span> </span></strong>is published under<strong><span> </span>Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial (CC BY-NC)</strong>. The opinions and contents of the articles published in<span> </span><strong>Acción Psicológica</strong><span> </span>are responsibility of the authors and do not compromise the scientific and political opinion of the journal. Authors are also responsible for providing copies of the raw data, ratings, and, in general, relevant experimental material to interested readers.</span></p> Assessing the Effects of Myths about Sexual Aggression on the Verisimilitude of a Victim-Complainant of Sexual Assault http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/30805 <p>Sexual violence against women is one of the most underre­ported criminal offences, and has one of the lowest con­viction rates. The main standard of proof is the victim’s-complainant’s testimony and the evaluation of credibility. In order to assess the effects of myths about sexual aggres­sion on the credibility of women and their testimony, a field study was performed. The study consisted of 353 par­ticipants (235 women), aged 16 to 72 years, who evaluated the credibility of a testimony of a victim-complainant of sexual assault where the type of narrative was manipulated (neutral, provocative clothing, and alcohol consumption), and responded to a measure of the acceptance of myths about sexual aggression. The results revealed the type of narrative had no effect on the evaluation of testimonial credibility, but an effect was found in the factors gender, and myths about sexual aggression. Succinctly, men con­ferred less credibility to a victim’s-complainant’s testi­mony (i.e., less victim-complainant honesty, and testimo­nial credibility), whilst attributing less responsibility to the aggressor-defendant. However, both men and women equally attributed responsibility to the victim-complainant for the sexual assault. Moreover, individuals sanctioning myths about sexual aggression attributed less honesty and credibility to the victim-complainant, and their testimony, whilst attributing less responsibility to the aggressor-de­fendant, and more to the victim-complainant. The impli­cations of the results on judgement-making are discussed.</p> Yurena Gancedo Jéssica Sanmarco Adriana Selaya Andrea González-Dapía Mercedes Novo Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 221–248 221–248 10.5944/ap.18.1.30805 Discomfort, coping and intervention in couple relationship during confinement by COVID-19 http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29394 <p>This work addresses the impact that confinement imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the couple. The results of the first published studies on the couple's relationship in confinement are presented and the specific elements of confinement that affected couple relationship are analyzed. The elements and characteristics of the conflicts presented by the people who demanded psychological attention are described and the interventions that were carried out are described, highlighting the usefulness of the concept of ideal emotional distance in this kind of intervention.</p> José Luis Martorell Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 1–10 1–10 10.5944/ap.18.1.29394 User Profile in an University Clinic during the COVID-19 Health Alarm http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29867 <p>This study aims to analyze the profile of users in an university clinic (SPA-UNED) during the first COVID-19 19 health alarm. The sample was composed of 124 participants (70.4% women) with an average age of 41.49 years and four instruments were used: <em>Symptom Assessment-45 Questionnaire</em> (SA-45), <em>Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure</em> (CORE-OM), <em>Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (</em>COPE-28) and the Scale Connor-Davidson Resilience (CD-RISC). The results showed a sociodemographic profile formed mainly by single Spanish women from the service sector. Consistent with the reasons for consultation, participants predominantly showed symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization, poor use of coping strategies, and low levels of resilience. These variables may be a possible risk profile in the clinical population that outlines a vulnerable group for which psychological prevention and intervention measures are required</p> Purificación Sierra-García Luis Ángel Saúl Miguel Ángel Carrasco Marcela Paz González-Brignardello Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 11–26 11–26 10.5944/ap.18.1.29867 Emotional Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic during the Spanish National Lockdown: Protective and Risk/Vulnerability Factors http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29520 <p>The objective of this work was to study the psychological impact of the pandemic COVID-19 and the national lockdown that took place in Spain during March and April 2020. We examined the prevalence of emotional distress, as well as protective and risk/vulnerability factors. A sample of 1,561 participants (aged 19 to 84 years) completed online the Coronavirus Psychological Impact Questionnaire (CIPC), the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale–12, and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Results show that many participants experienced high levels of emotional distress reflected through a 10-symptom distress profile in which worry, stress, hopelessness, sadness/depression and sleep problems predominated. We found some protective (age, income level, home garden, working outside the home), risk (media exposure, living with chronically ill and/or dependent persons, health worker) and vulnerability (sex, negative affect, intolerance of uncertainty) factors that significantly predicted the levels of distress. Negative affect and intolerance of uncertainty demonstrated to be strong predictors of distress. In addition, empirical evidence is provided on the validation of the Distress Emotional Scale of the CIPC.</p> Bonifacio Sandín Paloma Chorot Julia García-Escalera Rosa M. Valiente Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 27–44 27–44 10.5944/ap.18.1.29520 Emotional Intelligence and Life quality in Times of Mandatory and Preventive, Social Isolation during the Pandemic by COVID-19 http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29221 <p>Our goal is to describe the levels of the variables Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Quality of Life (QoL) in subjects affected by the context of Social, Preventive and Mandatory Isolation decreed on March 20 in Argentina during the COVID-19 pandemic, evaluate if there are significant relationships between them and analyze if they present differences based on sociodemographic variables such as: age and gender. We worked with a sample made up of 923 female and male people over 18 years of age from the general population. An ad-hoc sociodemographic questionnaire, the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS-24) instrument, and the Multicultural Quality of Life Index (MQLI) were used for data collection. The sample was contacted online from March 29 to July 6, 2020. The results showed that the correlation between the variable IE and CV was significant. The dimensions of these variables presented weak relationship strength with each other except Emotional Attention that only significantly correlated with a strong link strength with the variables Spiritual Fullness and Social Support as well as with Interpersonal Functioning, this time with moderate link strength. The levels of the CV variable are described as good in most of the subjects in the sample. EI levels are described as adequate for both genders in almost all subscales, presenting a difference for the gender in Emotional Clarity, resulting little for the male and adequate for the female, thus corroborating the hypotheses raised. Regarding the link between the EI and QOL variables based on the sociodemographic variables, significant differences were obtained in groups, being those between 71 and 80 years old, who do not consume psychoactive substances underwritten by a professional, and those who have a recreational containment network who obtained higher scores. In conclusion the results suggest that, although associations were found, longitudinal studies are necessary to consider the different phases of quarantine</p> Natalia Jimena Pallotto María C. De Grandis Lucas G. Gago-Galvagno Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 45–56 45–56 10.5944/ap.18.1.29221 Emergency intervention on online format based on act used in a case of Adapative Disorder http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29043 <p>This article aims to present the clinical approach of a pa­tient of the Psychological Service of the Faculty of Psy­chology of the UNED who was treated during the Covid-19 Health Emergency situation. This is a case study N = 1 of a 22-year-old man whose symptoms are associated to an adjustment disorder with mixed anxiety and depres­sion. After evaluating the case by means of an unstruc­tured interview and self-reports, a brief, protocolized in­tervention was carried out through an online modality. The therapeutic approach was the Acceptance and Commit­ment Therapy (ACT), which included different strategies aimed at allowing F. to discriminate his problematic be­havior pattern, accept aversive private events and take ac­tions with personal meaning. Results showed an increase in adaptive behaviors in the areas that F. considered valu­able, and a decrease in anxiety and depressive symptoms. In the final section, limitations and future recommedations are are discussed</p> Javier Mohd Tarifa Laura Cerezo Carrizo Miguel Ángel Carrasco Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 57–68 57–68 10.5944/ap.18.1.29043 The conflict between the physical and psychic need for human contact and the fear of people http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/28884 <p>One of the psychological effects of the measures that have been taken to deal with the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, to which less attention has been paid so far, is the fear of interpersonal relationships. For this reason, the need to adapt to coexistence with covid-19 and the measures that have been taken in this regard, also responding to the needs of relationship and emotional closeness between people is urgent. Although the need for distance between people has been highlighted, no indications have been given on how closer relationships can continue to be maintained safely and securely. This lack of information has turned into a great fear of personal closeness and can produce, especially in vulnerable people, a devastating “fear of others” and even “fear of oneself”, because they feel that they can become the source of illness and death for those close to you. The objectives try to respond to these needs, describing some of the intrapersonal conflicts derived from the current situation and, proposing a series of measures from both the social and psychotherapeutic fields to help people who need it.</p> Mónica Rodríguez-Zafra Antonia Martín-Sánchez Juan Carlos Ceniceros-Estévez Copyright (c) 2020 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 69–82 69–82 10.5944/ap.18.1.28884 The Mental Health Continuum during Confinement for COVID-19 in Argentinean Adults http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29711 <p>The pandemic that is going through the world presents characteristics that qualify it without any precedent. Most of the researches on epidemics and pandemics focused their studies on psychopathological variables, which produced ignorance about the consequences on the salugenic psychic variables. The aim of the present study was to study positive mental health during Sars-Cov-2 confinement in Argentinean adults. The sample was made up of 941 participants with an average age of 33.77 (<em>SD</em> = 14.14; 78.5% women, 20.8% men). The results reported that a large part of the sample presented moderate levels of mental health, a significant percentage flourishing mental health, while a smaller percentage reported languishing mental health levels. It is concluded that the way in which the situation is self-perceived by the subjects influences their levels of mental health.</p> Leandro Eidman Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 83–92 83–92 10.5944/ap.18.1.29711 Online Psychological Intervention during Confinement by COVID-19 in a Case of Phobic Symptomatology in Children using Cognitive Behavioral Game Therapy http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29455 <p>This article presents a therapeutic intervention in a case of childhood phobia addressed in the Applied Psychology Service of the Faculty of Psychology of the UNED. This case was studied in the frame of the Emergency Attention device due to the health alert status for Covid-19. The case presents a 5-year-old male child who is afraid of leaving home and of meteorological phenomena after the confinement stage. The therapeutic intervention was designed from the Cognitive Behavioral Game Therapy. The main objectives of the intervention were the reduction of the child's anxiety response to activities carried out outside the home and to unfavorable weather situations, as well as the progressive generalization of these activities both outside the home and in adverse weather situations. The proposed results were achieved over 6 sessions of 1-hour duration with weekly frequency, in an online format, and maintained after a three-month follow-up.</p> Alicia Oltra Paloma Salamanca Sandra Helena Veras Purificación Sierra-García Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 93–106 93–106 10.5944/ap.18.1.29455 Health Status of Adolescents in Spain, Mexico, and Chile during COVID-19: a cross-cultural study http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29018 <p>The pandemic caused by COVID-19 is an unprecedented crisis in recent history, which has had devastating consequences throughout the world. One of the populations most vulnerable to the effects of this health emergency are adolescents, as they are going through a life stage of profound changes in various aspects of their lives – social and economic instability adding as risk factors to the youth’s psychosocial adjustment. Cross-cultural studies have tried to compare and understand the differences in the adaptation of adolescents to the pandemic in different parts of the world. The aim of this study was to analyse the current health status, in comparison with the health status prior to the pandemic caused by COVID-19, in a sample of adolescents from Spain, Mexico and Chile. A total of 449 adolescents (75.90% girls) aged 12 to 17 years (<em>M</em>= 15.37; <em>SD</em>= 1.09) participated. Their general health status was studied by means of an ad hoc questionnaire, and descriptive analysis and Chi-square analysis were performed. The results show that, in general, adolescents in Chile tend to present a significantly higher incidence of physical and psychological symptoms during the pandemic, compared to their health status prior to the appearance of the coronavirus. These results emphasize the need to detect the specific needs of young people taking into account their social and cultural context, especially those who present worse health conditions in the most recent studies in psychology.</p> Alicia Tamarit Konstanze Schoeps Constanza Del Rosario Nancy A Amador Esparza Inmaculada Montoya-Castilla Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 107–120 107–120 10.5944/ap.18.1.29018 Resilience and Life Satisfaction during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Spain: The Relationship between Emotional and Socio-Demographic Variables http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/28386 <p>Concern about the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is reflected in the growing number of investiga­tions being carried out. This study aimed to measure the levels of resilience and life satisfaction in a sample of the adult population (n = 572) and to understand which varia­bles may be related to the ability to cope and subjective well-being. The results indicate that measures of depres­sion are negatively related to resilience (<em>r</em> = -.404) and life satisfaction (<em>r</em> = -.427), and measures of anxiety are also negatively related to resilience (<em>r</em> = -.308) and life satis­faction (<em>r</em> = -.426). The ANOVA shows statistically sig­nificant differences (<em>p</em> &lt; .01) between resilience and life satisfaction, with the variables social relationships, leisure time and expectations of the future impact of the pan­demic. These results can help us design and implement measures that promote well-being</p> Lourdes López de la Llave Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 121–134 121–134 10.5944/ap.18.1.28386 The Mediating Role of Psychological Strengths Between Academic/Work Interference and Mental Health during COVID-19 Lockdown http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29035 <p>The psychological impact due to the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has been evidenced. Some of the variables associated with this have been the presence of previous financial problems, being students or being inactive, all of them issues related to the work and academic scope. Consequently, the main objective of the work was to analyze the mediating role that personal strengths for mental health have in the face of academic/work interference caused by lockdown due to COVID-19 in Spain based on work status (students, workers active and inactive), controlling in turn for other sociodemographic variables (sex and age). For the data collection of this descriptive cross-sectional study, an online survey was used, composed of instruments to assess the degree of interference in academic/work activities (ad hoc), maladaptive coping strategies (COPE-28), resilience (CD-RISC), covitality (SEHS), healthy habits (ad hoc), psychological well-being (WHO-5) and psychological distress (PHQ-4). The results showed: on the one hand, that the groups of students and inactivity showed worse mental health indicators and personal resources, while the opposite effect was found in the group of active workers; and, on the other hand, the PROCESS mediation models (model 4) evidenced a damping effect of personal resources between perceived academic/work interference and psychological adjustment indicators (well-being and psychological distress), regardless of the work category. In conclusion, the protective role of personal resources in psychological adjustment during lockdown due to COVID-19 is highlighted</p> Alfonso López-Núñez Jose Antonio Piqueras Raquel Falcó STUDY GROUP A PSICO-RECURSOS-COVID-19 Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 135–150 135–150 10.5944/ap.18.1.29035 Psychological impact of confinement in a sample of older adults: longitudinal study before and during COVID-19 http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/29176 <p>Home confinement has been one of the measures taken in relation to COVID-19. Knowing what psychological consequences it entails is of interest, and particularly in the older adults.</p> <p>We analyze the impact of confinement on a sample of people over 65 years old evaluated before the pandemic (WAVE 1) and subsequently evaluated during home confinement (WAVE 2). A digital questionnaire distributed online (C.A.W.I -computer assisted web interviewing-) was administered to a sample of 141 people over 64 years old in Madrid. On the one hand, sociodemographic data, housing and services, health situation, health, physical function, physical exercise, depressive symptomatology, leisure and free time activities, social support, resilience, loneliness and well-being in the situation of confinement of the sample (WAVE 2) are investigated through descriptive analyses. In addition, comparison analyses are performed on some variables in the sample before the pandemic (WAVE 1) and during confinement (WAVE 2). The results show that well-being levels are preserved in the sample of this study.</p> Mª Ángeles Molina Martínez Teresa Paniagua Granados Virginia Fernández-Fernández Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 151–164 151–164 10.5944/ap.18.1.29176 Longitudinal Study on Perception of Loneliness during Confinement derived from COVID-19 in a Spanish Population Sample http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/28845 <p>The aim of the study is to longitudinally analyse the effects of confinement derived from Covid-19 on the loneliness of the general Spanish population. It was assessed by an online survey at three points in time: two weeks after the start of confinement (N = 3480), one month after (N = 1041) and two months after the return to normal (N = 569). Measures were taken of sociodemographic variables, loneliness, social support, depressive and anxious symptoms. To analyse the effect of the longitudinal measures, a mixed linear model (GLMM) was calculated for the solitude variable. Posthoc comparisons for the time variable were calculated using the marginal means estimated with Tuckey's correction. The analyses have been carried out using the R software (v3.5.6) and the lme4 and emmeans packages. The trend in loneliness scores is downward throughout the longitudinal study, decreasing the scores in the third evaluation significantly (Z<sub>(T1-T2)</sub> = 0.13, <em>p</em> = .045). The main predictors for loneliness are depressive symptomatology and social support. Greater attention needs to be paid to loneliness in these situations, in addition to presenting attention to associated depressive symptomatology and measures to strengthen social support networks in these circumstances</p> Berta Ausín Clara González-Sanguino Miguel Ángel Castellanos Manuel Muñoz Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 165–178 165–178 10.5944/ap.18.1.28845 Psychological Reactions during the First Week of Isolation by COVID-19 in Mexico http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/27915 <p>Quarantine or poor social isolation, can have negative implications for people's physical and emotional health. Therefore, to know the psychological and emotional reactions as a result of voluntary isolation based on the reason and number of home exits, the routine and the performance of pleasant activities during voluntary isolation at home by COVID-19 in the general population of Mexico is important. People who went out only what was necessary got the best scores in the different variables. In addition, a significant difference was found in most of the variables, in favor of those who reported having done pleasant activities in the last week, which they had not done for a long time. Developing interventions and promoting pleasant activities to cope with psychological distress is suggested.</p> Lucía del Carmen Quezada Berumen Mónica Teresa González Ramírez Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 179–188 179–188 10.5944/ap.18.1.27915 Psychological Distress an Coping Responses to Confinement for COVID-19 http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/31715 <p>The statement of the global pandemic situation due to COVID in 2020 led to the implementation of measures to confine the population and limit social contact, bringing with it economic and employment insecurity, which makes it a highly stressful event. These produce psychological distress encourage individuals to deploy coping strategies to overcome the effects. A field study was designed to find out the psychological distress caused by strict confinement and what coping responses triggered individuals to face this event and, through them, evaluate the effectiveness of coping exercised. To do this, a community sample with 338 participants who responded to a measure of psychological distress and another of coping with confinement was evaluated. The results showed a rate of moderate and clinical deteriorate cases (.834) significantly higher than expected, with an increase in the rate of cases due to the pandemic of 88%. In relation to the coping responses, the results revealed an increase in the use of avoidance strategies, decreasing confidence (-64.5%) in approximate strategies for coping with confinement due to the pandemic. In addition, coping with confinement due to pandemic increased the use of cognitive and behavioral strategies. Regarding the rate of use of the strategies, a significant frequency of employment was observed in all of them, the Emotional discharge strategy being significantly the most activated. The efficacy of the strategies deployed by the population to cope with confinement due to pandemic, characterized as maladaptive, passive, avoidant and focused on emotions, and the implications for the design of empowerment programs are discussed.</p> Dolores Seijo Álvaro Montes Verónica Marcos Jessica Sanmarco Mercedes Novo Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 189–204 189–204 10.5944/ap.18.1.31715 Anxiety and perception of risk of contagion among socially distanced Mexicans residents during the National Healthy Distance Campaign related to the COVID-19 epidemic. http://revistas.uned.es/index.php/accionpsicologica/article/view/27733 <p>In January 2020, Chinese scientists isolated a novel virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). On January 30th, The World Health Organization declared a Public Health Emergency. In March, Mexican Health Authorities announced the National Healthy Distance Campaign. This novel policy encourages residents of Mexico to stay at home during the social distancing stage to prevent the spread of the virus.The aim of this study was to evaluate the anxiety and the perception of risk of contagion through six weeks of follow-up during the National Healthy Distance Campaign in Mexico related to the COVID-19 epidemic. This study was empirical, exploratory and longitudinal. 27 Mexican people participated in the study, aged 18-59 years (M=35.4, SD=11.6). Two contextualized instruments were sent by email to participants to evaluate the anxiety levels and perception of risk of contagion for six weeks. Results indicate that anxiety levels were mild trough six weeks of follow-up. Likewise, results in the second survey indicate that perception of risk of contagion levels were moderate. For further studies on this subject, six hypotheses were developed regarding the following topics: content information and information overload, adaptation process, social perception of risk, preventive behaviors, and positive and negative effects of being social distanced.</p> Isaac Maldonado-Castellanos Ignacio Mora-Magaña Copyright (c) 2021 Faculty of Psychology. Applied Psychology Service (UNED) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 2021-06-30 2021-06-30 18 1 205–218 205–218 10.5944/ap.18.1.27733